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This Week In Music

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Born on March 21, 1685, in Eisenach Germany, Johann Sebastian Bach was one of the most remarkable musicians known to date. Born into a family of musicians, it's no surprise that he was blessed with great musical talent. In 1703, while composing chorale pieces, Bach was hired by a local church as an organist. Soon after marriage, Bach was appointed the organist and chamber musician for the Duke of Saxe-Weimar. During his tenure as the chamber musician/organist for the Duke of Saxe-Weimar, Bach became widely known as a very gifted organist. In 1722, Bach applied for a very prestigious position as Director of Music of the Thomasschule, where he began publishing his own compositions. Still a performer at hear, Bach became focused primarily with composition, writing over 300 selections. Johann Sebastian Bach died at the age of 65 after two failed surgeries to correct his vision. His music lives on and is recognized by the ears of musicians world-wide!

 




Symphony No. 94 in G Major was performed publicly for the first time, in London
Symphony No. 94, The Surprise Symphony, is one of twelve symphonies composed by Joseph Haydn called the London Symphonies. Haydn wrote this symphony in 1791 in London to be played for a concert series during his first visit to London. Many of Haydn's compositions contain unexpected segments or sections and the Surprise Symphony is no exception. This symphony contains one of the most unexpected and daring chords in the otherwise quiet and dynamic composition. A sudden fortissimo chord at the end of the piano opening is sure to startle a crowd! The music then returns to its original dynamic as if the "surprise" never happened. The audience was then left at the edge of their seats throughout the twenty three minute performance. The Surprise Symphony, now one of Haydn's most famous pieces, was instrumental in his brilliant debut in London. This daring symphony is still quite popular and is part of the regular cycle of symphonic repertoire for orchestras around the world.

 



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